July 2, 2020

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Solstice Red, Sort Of

Originally published January 19, 2011 LPOD-Jan19-11.jpg
image by Mike McCabe,

Excited about the prospect of seeing the first total lunar eclipse to happen on the winter solstice in more than 350 years, I arose from my slumber @ 2:00am EST only to be greeted by snow falling from the sky. There would be no eclipse viewing on this occasion from my area. However, later on that same day, and really much closer to the actual solstice, the skys cleared and a full moon shone in all its glory. Stacking an 18% light transmission moon filter and a red color filter, I sought to duplicate the effect of an actual eclipse with the sun's rays refracted through a healthy stratosphere. No trickery or deception intended, just all in good fun!

Chuck Wood

Technical Details
Kodak Z760 point and shoot through a 4.5" F8 newtonian reflector. F3.4, 1/8s, ISO200

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