February 22, 2021

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Another Moon

Originally published July 6, 2011 LPOD-Jul6-11.jpg
image by Julian Baum for the cover of The Moon

The Lunar Section of the British Astronomical Association is probably the longest existing organization that has actively promoted observation of the Moon. It encouraged study of the Moon over decades when no one else seemed interested. The BAA has reported its members' observations and theories in a series of publications. The newest one, recycling an older name, The Moon, has just been released. It includes a nice balance between observations and their interpretation, and historical pieces. Mike Brown has obtained the best image ever of the faint rille nearly perpendicular to the Straight Wall (p 23) and he shows that it is clearly depicted on Phillip Fauth's under-utilized giant map. In another piece LPOD contributor Phil Morgan discusses observations that he controversially interprets as indications that Proclus did not form from an oblique impact. The four historical pieces review the Lunar Section's publications (Denis Buczynski), Cassini's very definite observations of Schröter's Valley (Ivano Dal Prete), glimpses from Elger's notebooks (Nigel Longshaw) and a request to preserve the records of amateur lunar observers (R.A. Rosenfeld). I congratulate Bill Leatherbarrow and Nigel Longshaw, the editors of this new The Moon. And although I look forward to a larger issue #2, I must say I hate that the journal is an annual and the wait for a new one is 12 months. That is too long a lunation.

Chuck Wood

Technical Details
The Moon may be freely downloaded at the Lunar Section website.

Yesterday's LPOD: Crazy Quilt Imbrium

Tomorrow's LPOD: Instantaneous Time Markers



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