July 12, 2021

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The Northern Copernicus

Originally published November 23, 2011 LPOD-Nov23-11.jpg
image by Damian Peach

If the Moon were rotated 65° toward the south, Pythagoras would replace Copernicus as the most impressive visible crater. It is 50% larger than Copernicus, but not as young, its rays are much fainter. Like Copernicus, Pythagoras has two main mountainous peaks that are not quite centered. The broad floor, partly covered with debris, and the staircase of terraces add to the similarities with Copernicus. Like Hausen near the south pole, Pythagoras provides an oblique view of what large fresh complex craters really look like.

Chuck Wood

Technical Details
Sept 22, 2011.

Related Links
Rükl plate 2
Damian's website

Yesterday's LPOD: Full Mounts

Tomorrow's LPOD: Melt Crater Search



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