February 20, 2004

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Last Quarter

LPOD-2004-02-20.jpeg

Image Credit: Heung Wah

Last Quarter

The last week of each lunation is largely unobserved by Earthlings, most of whom sleep through the night. The last quarter Moon rises about midnight and is at its highest at sunrise. At last quarter the sunset line is near some of the most fascinating scenery on the Moon - from Plato and the Apennines in the north, pass the double threesome (Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus & Arzachel and Purbach, Regiomontanus & Walter) near center, and Tycho and Clavius down south. Just at the west limb, if the librations are favorable as on October 18, 2003 when this mosaic was captured, you can see the dark maria ribbons and central patch of Orientale basin. We are so lucky that humanity didn't arise on Mars. We have a real Moon with endless fascination, rather than two puny pip-squeaks, one of which sets in the east!

Technical Details:
This wonderful image was acquired by Wah! and Doucat at Astrofarm, Yuen Long, Hong Kong. They used a CGE-mounted Celestron 8" SCT and a ToUCam Pro webcam. 37 images were mosaicked together using K3CCD Tools and Photoshop 7.

Click here for full resolution view (1.7 MB).

Related Links:
ToUCam Pro II webcam
Another ToUCam source

Yesterday's LPOD: Max Goes to the Moon

Tomorrow's LPOD: We're on our Way, Houston!


Author & Editor:
Charles A. Wood

 


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